Category Archives: Joan Leotta, children, performing, writing, food, recipes, creativity,

children, writing, performing, book reviews, food, recipes, health, creativity, crafts for children, marketing books,

Thriller is the August Post

Somehow or other the July post was reposted on top of the August Post

Here is the meat of that post–scroll down for smoother version and the jpg of the magazine cover and photo of editor, Ammar.

Please tell us a bit about the history of your magazine and about the magazine’s goals present day? Particularly, can you define how your magazine differs from other crime magazines out there?

 Hi Joan! Thank you for the interview opportunity. The goal of Thriller Magazine is to showcase some established and rising voices of the thriller genre. Our hope is to be a publication that gives new authors a place to show their work alongside more well-known names. We publish short stories, flash fiction, poetry, and the occasional review/interview. I believe one thing missing in the publishing world are enough opportunities for newer authors. As a bestselling/award-winning author myself, I had a lot of difficulty publishing my earlier works when I started my writing career a few years ago. Therefore, I wanted to create a publication that gave newer authors a fair shot, and I think that is the biggest difference maker with Thriller Magazine.

 What made you make the decision to pay your short story contributors?

 We are actually not able to pay our contributors at this time. However, we have set it up to where we are going to start making some money through advertisements, and we plan to use those profits to pay our contributors by our 3rd issue (which will release next year). The main reason we want to start paying authors as soon as funds allow it is because I truly believe that authors and artists should be compensated and recognized for their works.

 What are you seeking in general and what especially delights you in a manuscript submission?

We publish a variety of sub-genres under the thriller genre. For our first issue (which was published earlier this month), we had a western thriller, a detective story, a superhero thriller, a horror thriller, and a murder thriller. So there is no one type of story that we favor. We enjoy works that have a strong voice and have some sort of emotional impact, even if that emotion is hollow. We want to feel ourselves in the shoes of the protagonist!

 What is an instant turn-off in a submission?

I think there are several. The biggest one is a rude submission. Another turn off is when an author has obviously not read the submission guidelines. One thing I’ve learned from being both an author and editor is that when there are two stories of equal quality and merit, the publication offer will always go to the author that is the easiest to work with. So those are some things to keep in mind when submitting work to different places!

What are some of your favorite journals/magazines?

 That’s a great question and is tough to answer! Outside of the major magazines/journals, some of the more niche ones I enjoy reading are Suspense Magazine & Grotesque Quarterly.

 How can writers contact you with questions and find out about submission calls?

We are currently accepting submission for our 2nd issue until October 15th! We’re looking for short stories under 5,000 words, flash fiction, and poetry up to 40 lines. You can read our guidelines at www.thrillermagazine.org. For any questions, please write to magazinethriller@gmail.com

Is there anything else you would like to say to writers who are considering submitting to you?

Like I mentioned earlier, we are accepting submission for our 2nd issue until October 15th! The issue will be out in December of this year. You can read more about our magazine and our submission guidelines on our website (www.thrillermagazine.org). We look forward to reading a lot of amazing stories.

Thank you for the interview, Joan! It was a real pleasure 😉

Thank you, Ammar!

 

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Writing for the King

krl_logo (2)original

Well, for King’s River Life, that is. Lori Ham’s magazine is a gem for mystery lovers. She not only publishes mystery short fiction, in her pages the wonderful Kevin Tipple and others review books, and offer an abundance of other information on the mystery genre.

The pages of this magazine also include reviews of some local California events, but her give-aways are open to all readers–so many mysteries, so little time. I’ve been fortunate enough to have some of my short stories appear on her virtual pages. She often requests stories geared to holidays–I found that to be a great way to break in.  Ham is great to work with and respects writers of all stripes–experienced, emerging, beginners.

Here are her responses to my questions:

Please tell us a bit about the history of your magazine and about the magazine’s goals present day? Particularly, can you define how your magazine differs from other crime magazines out there?

Our first issue came out May 29, 2010. I had been let go from my job with the local newspaper due to an issue with my editor-long story. I decided to start a magazine where I published all the things she had told me no one would read-it’s changed a lot from then. We celebrate 8 years this month. One way ours differs is because while half of each issue is mystery-reviews, interviews, author guest posts, TV reviews, mystery short stories-the other half is animal rescue, local entertainment, and other local color. As to goals-we just want to keep sharing great mystery content with our readers!

What are you seeking in general and what especially delights you in a manuscript submission?

We will consider all mystery short stories of any sub genres-nothing too graphic though. Prefer lengths between 1000-3000 words, but will take flash fiction and up to around 5000 words. We also look for a lot of holiday related mystery short stories each year-soon we will be taking submissions forJuly 4th mystery short stories.

I just love a story that is clever with great characters.

We don’t pay, but the writer gets a byline and a mini bio where they can promote anything they like-their blog, their latest book, whatever. And we do take reprints.

What is an instant turn-off in a submission?

Graphic sex, bad writing, unoriginal.

What are some of your favorite journals/magazines?

I spend most of my reading time reading books to review though I do have a subscription to the NY Times. I used to read a lot of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine and Alfred Hitchcock, and I used to devour the Writer’s Digest.

How can writers contact you with questions and find out about submission calls?

Our submission email is krlmagazine@gmail[dot]com. I always make a mention in our mystery Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/krlmysterygroup/. And I mention our calls on a lot of yahoo lists.

Is there anything else you would like to say to writers who are considering submitting to you?

Check us out-see what we are publishing and go for it kingsriverlife.com. We are ALWAYS looking for mystery short stories-holiday and just general. Right now we have something new and exciting starting up the end of this month-a mystery podcast called Mysteryrat’s Maze Mystery Podcast. We are going to be having actors from our area (we live near Fresno) reading mystery short stories and some mystery novel first chapters. We are mostly looking for around 2000 words-but we are in the process of feeling this all out so we are open to other lengths. Same submission contact info as the regular short stories. If you would like to sign up for our newsletter to keep up with the podcast you can do so at https://tinyletter.com/kingsriverlife.

New Magazine–Thriller! This is August post

Thriller Magazine Logo (1)

New on the “street” is Thriller Magazine, edited by Ammar Habib. They have an open call for submission until October 15, so read carefully, polish those pens and get writing!

Joan: Please tell us a bit about the history of your magazine and about the magazine’s goals present day? Particularly, can you define how your magazine differs from other crime magazines out there?

 Ammar : Hi Joan! Thank you for the interview opportunity. The goal of Thriller Magazine is to showcase some established and rising voices of the thriller genre. Our hope is to be a publication that gives new authors a place to show their work alongside more well-known names. We publish short stories, flash fiction, poetry, and the occasional review/interview. I believe one thing missing in the publishing world are enough opportunities for newer authors. As a bestselling/award-winning author myself, I had a lot of difficulty publishing my earlier works when I started my writing career a few years ago. Therefore, I wanted to create a publication that gave newer authors a fair shot, and I think that is the biggest difference maker with Thriller Magazine.

Joan: What made you make the decision to pay your short story contributors?

Ammar: We are actually not able to pay our contributors at this time. However, we have set it up to where we are going to start making some money through advertisements, and we plan to use those profits to pay our contributors by our 3rd issue (which will release next year). The main reason we want to start paying authors as soon as funds allow it is because I truly believe that authors and artists should be compensated and recognized for their works.

Joan: What are you seeking in general and what especially delights you in a manuscript submission?

Ammar: We publish a variety of sub-genres under the thriller genre. For our first issue (which was published earlier this month), we had a western thriller, a detective story, a superhero thriller, a horror thriller, and a murder thriller. So there is no one type of story that we favor. We enjoy works that have a strong voice and have some sort of emotional impact, even if that emotion is hollow. We want to feel ourselves in the shoes of the protagonist!

 Joan: What is an instant turn-off in a submission?

 Ammar: I think there are several. The biggest one is a rude submission. Another turn off is when an author has obviously not read the submission guidelines. One thing I’ve learned from being both an author and editor is that when there are two stories of equal quality and merit, the publication offer will always go to the author that is the easiest to work with. So those are some things to keep in mind when submitting work to different places!

 Joan: What are some of your favorite journals/magazines?

 Ammar:That’s a great question and is tough to answer! Outside of the major magazines/journals, some of the more niche ones I enjoy reading are Suspense Magazine & Grotesque Quarterly.

 Joan: How can writers contact you with questions and find out about submission calls?

 Ammar:We are currently accepting submission for our 2nd issue until October 15th! We’re looking for short stories under 5,000 words, flash fiction, and poetry up to 40 lines. You can read our guidelines at www.thrillermagazine.org. For any questions, please write to magazinethriller@gmail.com

Joan: Is there anything else you would like to say to writers who are considering submitting to you?

Ammar: Like I mentioned earlier, we are accepting submission for our 2nd issue until October 15th! The issue will be out in December of this year. You can read more about our magazine and our submission guidelines on our website (www.thrillermagazine.org). We look forward to reading a lot of amazing stories.

Ammar Habib

Thank you for the interview, Joan! It was a real pleasure 😉  Thank YOU, Ammar. Thriller looks like a great opportunity for mystery writers and a fun read for mystery lovers.

 

Update on KRL info below

It seems that the link is not working correctly in the blog below for you to hear my story read on the podcast–try this one–cut and paste it into your browser instead of clicking on it.

https://mysteryratsmaze.podbean.com/

Finding a Way at Kings River Life

Kings River Life Magazine now has two options–online “print” and Podcast!

krl_logo (2)original

Before the interview with editor Lorie Ham, I am including the link to my entry on their podcast! If the link does not show as live in this blog, please cut and paste into your browser to get to it. Lorie always is kind and gracious to writers and when she said she was starting a podcast, I sent her this story (previously published). It was amazing to hear the story read by a professional actor—who chose to read it in an Agatha Christie style radio mystery–made it feel as tho I had written a classic!!

If you have a good mystery you would like to see lovingly handled, please do read this interview with Lorie–She is a terrific editor to work with.

Kings River Life Magazine new podcasts!–July features my mystery, The Dead Lady’s Coat!!!!!
I am soooooooooo excited!!! Please
Interview with Lorie Ham:

Please tell us a bit about the history of your magazine and about the magazine’s goals present day? Particularly, can you define how your magazine differs from other crime magazines out there?

Lorie: Our first issue came out May 29, 2010. I had been let go from my job with the local newspaper due to an issue with my editor-long story. I decided to start a magazine where I published all the things she had told me no one would read-it’s changed a lot from then. We celebrate 8 years this month. One way ours differs is because while half of each issue is mystery-reviews, interviews, author guest posts, TV reviews, mystery short stories-the other half is animal rescue, local entertainment, and other local color. As to goals-we just want to keep sharing great mystery content with our readers!

What are you seeking in general and what especially delights you in a manuscript submission?

Lorie:We will consider all mystery short stories of any sub genres-nothing too graphic though. Prefer lengths between 1000-3000 words, but will take flash fiction and up to around 5000 words. We also look for a lot of holiday related mystery short stories each year-soon we will be taking submissions for July 4th mystery short stories.

I just love a story that is clever with great characters.

We don’t pay, but the writer gets a byline and a mini bio where they can promote anything they like-their blog, their latest book, whatever. And we do take reprints.

What is an instant turn-off in a submission?

Lorie: Graphic sex, bad writing, unoriginal.

What are some of your favorite journals/magazines?

Lorie: I spend most of my reading time reading books to review though I do have a subscription to the NY Times. I used to read a lot of Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine and Alfred Hitchcock, and I used to devour the Writer’s Digest.

How can writers contact you with questions and find out about submission calls?Lorie: Our submission email is krlmagazine@gmail[dot]com. I always make a mention in our mystery Facebook group https://www.facebook.com/groups/krlmysterygroup/. And I mention it on a lot of yahoo lists.

Is there anything else you would like to say to writers who are considering submitting to you?

Check us out-see what we are publishing and go for it kingsriverlife.com. We are ALWAYS looking for mystery short stories-holiday and just general. Right now we have something new and exciting starting up the end of this month-a mystery podcast called Mysteryrat’s Maze Mystery Podcast. We are going to be having actors from our area (we live near Fresno) reading mystery short stories and some mystery novel first chapters. We are mostly looking for around 2000 words-but we are in the process of feeling this all out so we are open to other lengths. Same submission contact info as the regular short stories. If you would like to sign up for our newsletter to keep up with the podcast you can do so at https://tinyletter.com/kingsriverlife.

De-mystifying Mystery Weekly

Mystery Weekly is a respected publisher in the mystery genre, published by Chuck and Kerry Carter out of Canada. Their guidelines  are on line at http://www.mysteryweekly.com.  The basics–2,500-7,500 words–never before in print. Unlike many others in the mystery genre–this one pays! Kerry Carter graciously answered these questions to further clarify what they want in a story:

Please tell us a bit about the history of your magazine and about the magazine’s goals present day?

Back in September of 2015, we wanted to create another market for authors to get their stories out there. But if I’m completely honest, our motives weren’t entirely altruistic. Of course it’s satisfying to have a creative outlet by curating stories, choosing covers and releasing a new issue each month. But it’s also very exciting (in that same way a prospector must feel), to read through submissions and discover new voices and talent.

We actually started as an e-zine, sending out a free original mystery each week, hence the name “Mystery Weekly Magazine.” But, less than a month later, we decided to roll up these weekly stories into a monthly Print-On-Demand (POD) issue on Amazon, adding a few extra stories as a bonus. Over the years, we sent out fewer and fewer free stories by email and focused on our monthly issue. But there is still some confusion about what we do, so I would like to set the record straight.

We are primarily a monthly POD mystery magazine, but we’re also distributed through various digital subscription channels such as Kindle Newsstand and in schools/libraries via Flipster. We have never published any of our stories online.

Our goals for 2018 are to increase our compensation to authors, which we’ve recently done, and to continue to support the mystery fiction community through our sponsorships and scholarships, such as our 2018 Emerging Mystery Writer Scholarship which was open to entries until May 30th.

What are you seeking in general and what especially delights you in a manuscriptsubmission?

My favorite types of stories are not well represented in the other mystery magazines. There are a lot of magazines specializing in hardboiled, flash, or literary fiction, but often the story takes a back seat to flowery prose or gratuitous violence.

Generally, I’m looking for an original, compelling story. I especially like cross-genre submissions and humorous mysteries, with a satisfying or surprise ending. I try to buy a diverse selection of stories to please as many readers’ tastes as possible.

What is an instant turn-off in a submission?

We have very clear submission requirements, but it’s surprising how often writers disregard them. Because we’re distributed in school libraries, we want to keep our rating to an equivalent of PG-13 or milder; hardboiled is fine, but don’t boil it so much that it becomes distasteful.  Another turn-off is laziness. I can tell if a writer has put effort into their submission. Avoid simple spelling and grammar errors, weak words, and plot inconsistencies.

What are some of your favorite journals/magazines?

I’ve read all the top mystery magazines for years and years. But now I have so many of our own submissions to read that I have an ever growing pile of magazines and books on my shelf, waiting for a long vacation.

How can writers contact you with questions and find out about submission calls?

We have a contact form on our site. Any question, big or small, is welcome! We often answer within minutes, but rarely it may take a day or two. If we have a special issue in mind such as our pastiche issue or western or humor issue, we will send out calls for submission by Twitter or to writing groups.

Is there anything else you would like to say to writers who are considering submitting to you? 

We are always open for submissions. I’ll read your story from start to finish and take notes in case feedback is requested (but please, only request feedback if you’re sure you can handle it!). If I turn down your story, remember that it doesn’t mean I think your story is bad; it only means I have other submissions that would fit better into our next issues. And private eye stories, mariticide, and other overused themes are a hard sell regardless of how well they’re written.

We pay immediately upon acceptance, and typically you’ll see your story in print in the next monthly issue or two. We’ll also advertise your other works (novels) for free in our emails or magazine if requested, and support you in any way we can.

Finally, I recommend you read one of our current issues. If you’re on a budget, you can read us for free with a 30-day trial Kindle Newsstand Subscription, or via Flipster at your local library.

 

 

De-Mystifying Mystery Weekly

This is a great market–hope this helps all of us understand it better–let me know if you find this information helpful!

Kerry Carter, the editor answered the blog questions and provided some helpful hints on how to better research the magazine.

Please tell us a bit about the history of your magazine and about the magazine’s goals present day?

Back in September of 2015, we wanted to create another market for authors to get their stories out there, but our motives weren’t entirely altruistic. It’s satisfying to have a creative outlet by curating stories, choosing covers and releasing a new issue each month. It’s also very exciting to read through submissions and discover new voices and talent.

We actually started as an email magazine (e-zine), sending out a free original mystery every week, hence the name Mystery Weekly Magazine. Less than a month later, we decided to roll up these weekly stories into a monthly Print-On-Demand (POD) issue on Amazon, adding a few extra stories as a bonus. Over the years, we sent out fewer and fewer free stories by email and focused on our monthly issue. Today we’re also distributed through various digital subscription channels such as Kindle Newsstand, and in schools and libraries via Flipster.

Our goal is to continue to increase our compensation to authors, which we’ve recently done on May 1st, and to continue to support the mystery fiction community through sponsorships and scholarships. We’re thrilled to be sponsoring the 2019 Arthur Ellis Award for Best Short Story, and hope to continue our Emerging Mystery Writer Scholarships.

What are you seeking in general and what especially delights you in a manuscript submission?

Generally, I’m looking for an original, compelling story. I especially like cross-genre submissions and humorous mysteries, and a satisfying or twist ending. I try to buy a diverse selection of stories to please as many readers’ tastes as possible. Every issue is a mixed bag from cozy to noir.

What is an instant turn-off in a submission?

It’s bewildering to me that so many writers disregard our clear submission requirements. Because we’re distributed in school libraries, we want to keep our rating to an equivalent of PG-13 or milder. Another turn-off is laziness; I can tell if a writer has put effort into their submission. Avoid simple spelling and grammar errors, weak words, and plot inconsistencies.

What are some of your favorite journals/magazines?

I’ve read all the top mystery magazines for years and years. Now I have so many of our own submissions to read that I have an ever-growing pile of magazines and books on my shelf, waiting for a long vacation.

How can writers contact you with questions and find out about submission calls?

We have a contact form on our site. Any question, big or small, is welcome! We often answer within minutes, or rarely it may take a day or two. If we’re planning a special issue such as our Sherlock Holmes, Western and humour issues, we’ll send out a call for submissions.

Is there anything else you would like to say to writers who are considering submitting to you? If you have any open submission calls.

We are always open for submissions. I’ll read your story from start to finish and take notes in case feedback is requested. Avoid cliché private eye stories, mariticide, and other overused themes. They would be a hard sell, regardless of how well they’re written.

We pay immediately upon acceptance, and typically you’ll see your story in print in the next monthly issue or two. We’ll also advertise your other works (novels) for free in our emails or magazine if requested, and support you in any way we can.

Finally, I recommend you read one of our current issues. If you’re on a budget, you can read us for free with a 30-day trial Kindle Newsstand Subscription, or via Flipster at your local library.